Category Archives: Written history

Pure ‘white’ race – did it ever exist? Part 1

(based mainly on David Mac Ritchie’s Ancient and Modern Britons Volume 1, ISBN 9781592322251)51tqkszqn0l-_sy344_bo1204203200_

In keeping with accuracy, Britain does not mean just England. I mean it as synonymous with British Isles (the collective name of the island containing England, Scotland & Wales – what used to be called Albion/ Prettania/ Brettania/ Alouíōn), Ireland (Northern & Republic – what used to be called Ierne/ Hibernia/ Iouernía), and the surrounding smaller islands.

When I first heard of this book I knew I wanted it. Now I’ve got it, it’s quickly becoming one of the most fascinating books on ‘race’ I’ve ever read. Mac Ritchie was a ‘white’ Scottish historian & folklorist, yet the information he delivers will probably be nothing short of miraculous to ‘black’ people interested in ‘black’ history.

Disclaimer: As informative as it is, it must be remembered it was written in the 1800s before knowledge of DNA was available to corroborate. It was also the time when scientific racism was at its peak. I just present this info as a potentially useful guideline and insight into the mindset of the past. If you want to see how true the claims are, please do your own research to independently verify. 

Continue reading Pure ‘white’ race – did it ever exist? Part 1

The Plow: Origin of Sexism?

Sarvodaya

You read that correctly. There have been all sorts of theories as to why discrimination towards women seems so pervasive and near-universal, and from where it comes from to begin with. But a crude farming tool is by far the most interesting and unexpected origin. As the Economist – my most cherished and regularly read source – recently reported, a team of economists, of all people, set out to prove that the adoption of the plow coincided with a change of attitudes towards women that persists to this day.

Specifically, a move towards large-scale and labor-intensive agriculture – defined by the adoption of the heavy plow – created an economic system in which one’s physical strength and endurance became a major basis for productivity, and they key to society’s survival. Men were naturally more adept in this new function, and from this crucial role they would subsequently come to dominate…

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Aryans – native after all?

(based mainly on Jagat K. Motwani’s None But India [Bharat]: The Cradle of Aryans, Sanskrit, Vedas, & Swastika – ISBN 9781450261272)

none-but-india-bharat-the-cradle-of-aryans-sanskrit-vedas-swastika

In Western academia the story goes like this: Continue reading Aryans – native after all?

The term “Europe”

This word has had a very interesting history. Now it has a more or less concrete definition, complete with boundaries, maps and dictionaries to back it up. But it wasn’t always this way. Even today there’s no physical boundary between it and Asia. Consider this quote from Wikipedia (bolding mine):

“Europe is a continent that comprises the westernmost part of Eurasia. Europe is bordered by the Arctic Ocean to the north, the Atlantic Ocean to the west, and the Mediterranean Sea to the south. The eastern boundary with Asia is a historical and cultural construct, as there is no clear physical and geographical separation between them; Europe is generally considered as separated from Asia by the watershed divides of the Ural and Caucasus Mountains, the Ural River, the Caspian and Black Seas, and the waterways of the Turkish Straits.[4] Yet the non-oceanic borders of Europe—a concept dating back to classical antiquity—are arbitrary. The primarily physiographic term “continent” as applied to Europe also incorporates cultural and political elements whose discontinuities are not always reflected by the continent’s current overland boundaries.”

– Taken from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Europe, 4th May 2017

Continue reading The term “Europe”

His name wasn’t Christopher Columbus!

Did you know that? The guy who “discovered”* the Americas was actually called Cristoforo Colombo! Since he was ITALIAN he had an ITALIAN name!

*(after the Arawaks/ Taìnos/ Algonquins/ other native groups and Vikings, that is)

This is an example of anglicisation, the English habit of altering foreign names or words to sound more English, or at least European. To a degree everyone does it, but English people seem to take  it to a whole new level of disrespect. Sometimes the anglicised forms don’t even resemble the original.

(On a slight tangent, this is why I refused to let anyone shorten my name in school. I’ve even had one boy directly say he didn’t like my name – see how racists operate? Can’t even gather enough brainpower to repeat what they hear)

Other examples:

Ibn Sina – Avicenna

Ibn Rushd – Averroes (the fuck?!?)

Yeshua/ Yehoshua – Jesus

Muslim – Moslem/ Mohammedan

Zarathushtra – Zoroaster

Jinn – Genie

Kurush/ Kurosh – Cyrus the great

Salahuddin (pronounced sa-laa-hud-deen) – Saladin

Mikael (pronounced mi-ka-el) – Michael (pronounced my-kerl)

David (pronounced da-veed) – David (pronounced day-vid)

Yochanan/ Yochanna – John

Azania – South Africa

Jabal-Tariq – Gibraltar

Mikołaj Kopernik – Nicholas Copernicus (did you know he was Polish?)

Piyush Jindal – Bobby (WTMFH?!?)

Leo Africanus (admittedly not English but European nonetheless) – Al-Hasan ibn Muhammad al-Wazzan!!!

 

People need to stop that shit, especially Africans. Simple mispronunciations are understandable, but if someone tries to shorten or rename you without your approval, don’t allow it. And don’t do it for them just to fit in or make it easier  for them either, make them learn to adapt  to you exactly as they like to make you do.